Thursday’s Special: Deconstruction

According to The Free dictionary Deconstruction is “a philosophical movement and theory of literary criticism that questions traditional assumptions about certainty, identity, and truth; asserts that words can only refer to other words, and attempts to demonstrate how statements about any text subvert their own meaning”. Or in a pretty straightforward definition taken out from the M-W Learner’s dictionary  Deconstruction is “a theory used in the study of literature or philosophy which says that a piece of writing does not have just one meaning and that the meaning depends on the reader”.

Now how does this apply to art?

Deconstruction is a way of understanding how something was created, usually things like art, books, poems and other writing. It means breaking something down into smaller parts. Deconstruction looks at the smaller parts that were used to create an object. The smaller parts are usually ideas.

Deconstruction also inspired deconstructivism in architecture. Maybe you were lucky enough to see in person some of its finest examples like the building of the Guggenheim Museum Museum in Bilbao or Libeskind’s War Museum in Manchester. Examples in architecture can be found in other countries as well.

For this challenge you may want to publish photos of deconstructivist architecture or explore the idea of deconstruction in an example of your own artistic analysis like I did in the image bellow.

If you like being challenged and want to push yourself creatively, then this is the challenge for you. 

Further reading:

http://www.iep.utm.edu/deconst/

https://www.britannica.com/topic/deconstruction

 

kvacica-1_potpis

 

About Thursday’s Special: it is a colour photo challenge that takes place on Thursdays. Concrete themes are provided and announced well in advance. See the Scheduled Challenges page. You are supposed to make a post on the given theme (today it is deconstruction), link to this post, and leave your links in the comment section bellow. The deadline is Tuesday 13 September.

jupiter najnajnoviji

 

P.S. After reading your comments and Tobias’s post I realised that I should have put some kind of explanation for the image above.  In my photographic analysis I focused on the premise that “deconstruction looks at the smaller parts that were used to create an object, and that the smaller parts are usually ideas.” I shot a bunch of clothes pegs lined up together focusing on the idea of a coil (spring) in the core of a clothes peg. The idea of pinching is in the bottom of a peg idea, to attach clothes to a rope. 

 

Here are the responses to the challenge:

https://artishorseshit.wordpress.com/2016/09/15/deconstruction/

https://tishfarrell.com/2016/09/15/blown-away-opium-poppy-thursdays-special

https://geriatrixfotogallerie.wordpress.com/2016/09/15/on-the-move-2

https://ameditativejourney.wordpress.com/2016/09/15/thursdays-special-deconstruction

https://ledrakenoir.wordpress.com/2016/09/16/strong-but-sensitive-protection/

https://smallbluegreenwords.wordpress.com/2016/09/17/thursday-special-9/

https://jennysotherstuff.wordpress.com/2016/09/17/deconstruction

https://empireoflights.com/2016/09/16/deconstruction

https://dailymusing57.com/2016/09/18/thursdays-special-deconstruction

https://beyondthebrushphotography.wordpress.com/2016/09/18/the-bridge

https://picturesimperfectblog.wordpress.com/2016/09/18/die-quadratur-des-aluhuts-the-quadrature-of-the-tinfoil-hat/

https://lucidgypsy.com/2016/09/20/thursday-special-deconstruction/

https://suejudd.com/2016/09/21/deconstruction

 

75 thoughts on “Thursday’s Special: Deconstruction

  1. So interesting- I have heard the term used in cooking- chefs like to make a dish “deconstructed” Deconstructed dishes may take the foods that are normally combined in the dish, change their forms, and then plate them together in a different way. It’s not just about taking the dish apart, but putting its elements back together. I’ll have to think on this one Paula!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Deconstruction – artishorseshit

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  6. This is way too intellectual for me. I don’t really spend a lot of time thinking about the pictures I take, at least not before or during the capture. I think about what I want them to be afterwards, when I’m processing, but to me, this is overthinking a visual thing. I actually have no idea where to even begin this kind of analysis. Even as a writer, I tend to work from some part of my brain that is not part of the “consciously cognitive” part of me. I would love to participate, but truthfully, I haven’t the slightest idea how I would go about it. Sorry! I’m not a very intellectual artist, I think. I’m very frontal lobe about other stuff … but not art.

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    • Hello Tobias. I have found your comments in spam box (not my doing of course) and have set you free. Accidental spamming has been an issue on WordPress recently. I have been a victim too. Thank you for the inspiring article. It should have been you to run this challenge, not me.🙂

      Like

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    • Yes, her was a very pragmatic and down to earth interpretation and I love it. And yours Lisa, with your literal approach to de-construction of one of my favourite subjects…. What can I say, but smile contently. Thank you.

      Like

  10. Pingback: Die Quadratur des Aluhuts – The quadrature of the tinfoil hat | picturesimperfectblog

  11. Really a topic to get on thinking. I was lucky enough to see this building (and a few others) in Düsseldorf, Germany, with an architect at my side who explained a bit about them. There are a number of architectural objects of interest next to the river Rhine, in the quarter known as “Medienhafen”, and this tinfoil covered building (actually, it is stainless steel) is part of three buildings (named after the architects Gehri-Bauten). It is the middle one and the two buildings on either side are reflected in its surface. Since we were only on this side of the river I could not get a photo from all three as a unit. https://picturesimperfectblog.wordpress.com/2016/09/18/die-quadratur-des-aluhuts-the-quadrature-of-the-tinfoil-hat/

    Like

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